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James Browning. Electronic Text Communication

 

Laziness of Informality

 

Perhaps the main reason for all the contrast between this written form of communication and traditional written language of newspapers and letters is that due to electronic communications’ personal level, they are informal. So informal that it replicates spoken language. This is characterised by its slang words, its nonce formations and the spellings. In slang “cuppa” is said instead of “cup of”, in text-messaging spellings similar to this - the merging of two words, regularly appear:

Outta - out of

Gotta - got to

Other features of slang speech arise in pronunciation. Some people (commoners) pronounce “that” with a “d”, so it ends up as “dat”. This baffles me on text messages I receive. This happens with other “th” words, such as “this” and “then”. Similarly, “f” sounds replace “ph” and “th” sounds due to the sheer laziness of pronunciation. A regular scene in a text message is an “I fink”.

Sitting alongside slack spelling is the lack of punctuation and grammar. Admittedly, paragraphs are impossible on text messages. But, punctuation is often ignored, full stops often missing out. Example:

He knows who he is x

At first glance, one who doesn’t know that an “x” represents a kiss, would be trying desperately to work out the meaning, perhaps trying to work out who x is.

The comma often gets disregarded:

Well I love this guy more xx

Also overlooked is the apostrophe:

Who wouldve thought it?

Often northern “the’s” creep in:

That’s tway I see it.

Sometimes questions don’t get the question mark: “y”.

Capitalisation has bitten the dust. Proper nouns, such as names and the first person pronoun “I”, are habitually spurted in lower case:

bob and i

i love u baby, i miss you

Other types of punctuation have gained popularity. Abnormal hyphenation is something I regularly adhere to:

what-a-wonderful-woman! 

Tone originally hard to express in written communication, is easier in electronic communication. Sarcasm, a regular feature of British speech is shown with a bracketed exclamation mark:

You are a joke (!)

Exclamation is often shown by an exaggerated use of punctuation:

I love you!!!!!!

The use of several exclamation marks hammers home the point. The use of emotive punctuation sequences follows in question marks and often a combination of both question and exclamation marks.

u what?!?!?!?!?!?! 

Suspense is generated the traditional way with the use of 3 full stops.

...Yes you can

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ELECTRONIC TEXT COMUNICATION

  The Need to Economise

  SMS Shorthand

  Emoticons Rule

  Abbreviation Craze

  Laziness of Informality

  Conclusions

BEST ESSAYS

  The Language of the Internet

  English Reasserts Its Status

  More   

 

 
 
 
 

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