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James Browning. Electronic Text Communication

 

 Emoticons Rule

 

Vowels aren’t the only thing omitted in text communication. Words often fall foul of certain sentences where the writer believes them not to be compulsory to the understanding. An example of this could be:

Where we going?

Even though this sentence doesn’t have the verb “are”, it’s still obvious in the communication that it means, “Where are we going?”

Therefore similarly to the general theme, the omission saves characters, time and effort, but it is practical. This grammatical construction goes alongside breaking concord grammar rules. For instance exchanging personal pronouns: “Me ain’t good” instead of “I am not good”. 

Omitting whole sentences is also a feature. Emoticons - a merge of letters and punctuation - used to draw facial expressions, can be used to replace all words. Another use is to show the tone of a previous or forthcoming statement. They are often used to show an emotional reaction to information given on a previous message.

A colon and a close bracket can show a smile: 

:)       :-) 

A colon followed by an open bracket depicts a frown: 

:(       :-( 

Other emoticons, include winks ;-), cheekiness :-P, a kiss :-X, and even surprise :-O.

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ELECTRONIC TEXT COMUNICATION

  The Need to Economise

  SMS Shorthand

  Emoticons Rule

  Abbreviation Craze

  Laziness of Informality

  Conclusions

BEST ESSAYS

  The Language of the Internet

  English Reasserts Its Status

  More   

 

 
 
 
 

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