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 The Rise & Fall of West Saxon

 

Characteristics of Late West Saxon

      This dialect flourished in the second half of the tenth century

      It is preserved in the writings of Ælfric, Wulfstan, Æthelwold, Byrhtferth, and others, as well as the continuation of the Chronicle

        A noticeable consistency appears in the work of scribes from monasteries all over the country, with remarkable similarity in spellings, words, and constructions

      Ælfric even revised aspects of his earlier work to make his use of noun endings and verb forms more consistent

        Several Early West Saxon manuscripts were corrected by scribes to satisfy their sense of what was becoming standard

        The West Saxon standard continued to have influence throughout the eleventh century but gradually fell out of use

         It did not become the foundation of present-day Standard English

        During the Middle English period the centre of gravity of the new kingdom moved away from Winchester and towards London

        The impetus to write in this dialect largely died out during the eleventh century

        The process was gradual: a great deal of twelfth-century religious writing displays the continuing influence of West Saxon norms

         In the Herefordshire region of the West Midlands there is evidence of its continued influence even in the early thirteenth century

 

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THE RISE & FALL OF WEST SAXON

  Alfred the Great

  The Rise of West Saxon (Wessex)

  Characteristics of Early West Saxon

  Characteristics of Late West Saxon

OLD ENGLISH

  The Origins of Old English

  Main Influences on Old English

  The Lord's Prayer in Old English

  Beowulf Home

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