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The Impact of the Bible

  The King James Bible (1611)

 

 

 
  • This version was formally "appointed to be read in Churches"

 
  • This gave its language a level of prestige which would prove to be more widespread and longer lasting than any Bible of the previous century

 
  • The language chosen by the translators was ultimately derived from the London dialect which had been showing signs of standardization since Caxton's time

 
  • Linguistic conservatism of the King James translators was reflected in the language of the translation

 
  • They often opted for older forms of the language even when modern alternatives were available – older word orders (e.g., speak ye unto, things eternal) and verb forms (e.g., digged, wist "knew", brethren)

 
  • The King James Bible has contributed far more to English in the way of idiomatic or proverbial expressions than any other literary source (take the biblical phrases test)

 
  • Its lexicon is less than half that of Shakespeare, but its impact has been much greater

 

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THE IMPACT OF THE BIBLE

  The Bible as a Standardising Force

  William Tyndale’s New Testament

  Linguistic Influence of Tyndale

  Coverdale's Bible (1535)

  Matthew's Bible (1537)

  The Great Bible (1539)

  The Geneva Bible (1560)

  The Bishops' Bible (1568)

  The King James Bible (1611)

MODERN ENGLISH

  The "Ink-horn" Controversy 

  Humour & Pathos in Shakespeare

  Biblical Phrases Test

  British vs. American English

  More

 

 
 
 
 

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